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Susan Muncey

Peacocks in Textiles, Interiors and Decorative Art: Colour, Ostentation and Allegory

Peacocks are known to be aggressive. A London boxing gym is even named after the pugnacious bird. But peacocks are nothing to be scared of – they have appeared in art and fashion throughout the ages. In China, peacocks are a manifestation of the mythical phoenix and linked to fame, luck, divinity, rank power and beauty: […]

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Body Shape: Food, Fetishism and Fashion

No one bats an eyelid if you mention bums, boobs, or any other ‘b’ words describing ‘sexualized’ parts of the anatomy today. It was different in Victorian times, which is why the word bustle was invented. Victorians were as obsessed with their bodies as we are now. Women wore bustles with corsets to fill out the rump […]

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China Tea Connection: History, Culture, Ceremony and Craft

Everything is connected. People say the world is getting smaller, but external cultural influences have inspired tastes in food, style, art and design for as long as man has travelled. In China, tea has been drunk for millennia, but the art of drinking tea is a culture all of its own. Gonfu Cha, the Chinese tea ceremony means “making […]

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Shell Sculpture: The Four Seasons by Caroline Perrin

We thought you might like to know more about the unique shell sculpture adorning the cover of Visuology Magazine Issue 4. The story behind this unusual piece is that it is one of a set of four sculptures depicting the four seasons, by French craftswoman, Caroline Perrin. Caroline is already well known for her decorative […]

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Visuology Magazine: The Food of Life Issue

Visuology Magazine – The Food of Life Issue – is out now. We’ve given the magazine a makeover for Issue 4, with a redesign by our new Art Director, Harriet Bedder. This issue also sees contributions from new Trend Features Editor, Sally Angharad, and Assistant Features Editor, Bronte Naylor-Jones. The restyled magazine is divided into four sections: collecting, making, giving and […]

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Threads, Fringes and Handcrafted Fashion: In Conversation with Kelsey Hutton

From passementerie to fashion adornments so extreme that the decoration becomes the fabric itself. Just when you thought we were over fringing, this is something you’ll be seeing even more of in the spring – with fringing becoming an integral part of the fabric. The frayed fabric look has been seen on the catwalks of Chanel, […]

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Passementerie for Home Furnishings: Interior Design Trimmings

London’s Chelsea Harbour Design Centre houses some of the world’s foremost passementerie specialists. Samuel and Sons offer a wide array of tassels, borders, braids, gimp, fringes and custom made trims to interior designers and architects. Their Labyrinth border is “inspired by the proportions and configuration of classic architectural mazes from Grecian antiquity.” Raised satin stiches stand […]

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VV Rouleaux: A Top Spot for Trimmings

VV Rouleaux is more than just a ribbon shop. The 25 year old haberdashery emporium is an Aladdin’s cave of trimmings. From feathered birds (great for Christmas decorations as well as hats) to pom-poms, tassels and Chanel-style grosgrain ribbon, the colour filled store is a cherished resource for dressmakers, milliners and home accessories designers. Owner Annabel […]

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Passion for Passementerie: Adornments, Decoration and Colour

In Visuology Issue 3, we flagged up the growing use of passementerie in fashion and interior design. We thought the run up to Christmas, with its explosion of colourful decorations, would be the perfect time to showcase some of the passementerie that has captured our attention over the past couple of years. In 2014, we […]

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